2014/05/12

Tutankhamun Silver Trumpet

The Silver Trumpet of Tutankhamun


The Silver Trumpet of Tutankhamun


This silver trumpet with its golden mouthpiece was found with a decorated wooden core inside, probably to protect the thin metal from distortion, or to help in cleaning inside its tube with a piece of cloth.

The decoration on the bell shows incised scenes of the gods Amun-Re and Re-Horakhty before Ptah.

From experiments, the sound produced was described as "raucous and powerful" and it is likely that the trumpet signal code was a rhythmic one on a single pitch.

Tutankhamun Flexible Bracelet

Flexible Bracelet of king Tutankhamun



Howard Carter, who discovered the tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922, called this type of bracelet a "wristband," because it is composed of rows of barrel-shaped beads that make the bracelet flexible around the wrist. The beads are made of gold, electrum, blue glass, lapis lazuli, and calcite.

The principal ornament is a large scarab at one end of the bracelet; when worn, the scarab would have appeared to be the central ornament. The scarab is not a single piece of stone, but is made of a number of pieces of lapis lazuli fitted most carefully into gold cloisons fixed to a gold plate. Between the rear legs of the scarab is a basket-shaped sign inlaid with blue glass.

Tutankhamun Flexible Bracelet

The scarab and the basket sign were intended to spell out King Tutankhamun's other name, Neb-kheperw-re, but instead of the expected sun disc between the forelegs, there is a cartouche of the king with the same signs.

The bracelet is edged with gold beads and it is finished with a gold fastening, which slides into a corresponding fitting on the side of the scarab to secure the bracelet when it is worn. The bracelet bears signs of having been worn during the king's lifetime.

Signet Ring with the name of Tutankhamun

Signet Ring with the name of Tutankhamun


Signet Ring with the name of Tutankhamun


Only the very thin oval bezel and part of the band is left of this stirrup-shaped ring. The prenomen of Tutankhamun, Neb-kheperu-Re, has been carved within a border on the bezel.

Pectoral of Tutankhamun with the Winged Scarab

Pectoral of Tutankhamun with the Winged Scarab


This beautiful pendant illustrates the throne name of King Tutankhamun, "Neb- kheprew-re." The central element is the scarab "Khepri" made of a fine piece of lapis lazuli, and three strokes of plural "sign in hieroglyphs" below it.

Pectoral of Tutankhamun with the Winged Scarab

Between the forelegs of the scarab, the risen sun disk "Re" is depicted. It is made of a clear red carnelian set in gold, which represents what, in nature, was the ball of mud and dung containing its eggs that was rolled forward by the beetle. Beneath the plural strokes "sign in hieroglyphs" is a basket shape "Neb" inlaid with turquoise.

The gold wings that are often added to the scarab represent Re, the god of the rising sun. They sweep round to form an almost complete circle, enveloping the royal name and offering it divine protection.

Tutankhamun Necklace of the Sun

 Tutankhamun Necklace of the Sun 
on the Eastern Horizon

One of the most striking features of Egyptian symbolism is the number of different ways in which a single theme could be pictorially expressed. Both this necklace and the necklace of the rising sun commemorate in their inlaid gold pectoral pendants what is essentially the same daily event, but in this instance the baboons are omitted.

The baboons, by their presence, showed that the action was taking place at sunrise, whereas in this case the same effect is produced by the use of the hieroglyphic sign for 'horizon' (akhet), which represents the sun rising between two mountains. It involves the introduction of a foreign element (i.e. the mountains) into the naturalistic episode of the scarab (= the sun-god) pushing its ball of dung (= the sun) in front of it.

Tutankhamun Necklace of the Sun

By this slight deviation from what was regular and normal, the artist has given temporal and local precision to a symbol which would otherwise have lacked any indication of time and place. He has also added uraei with pendent 'life' signs (ankh) to the 'horizon' hieroglyph, thus signifying that the rising sun is bringing life to Upper and Lower Egypt. Apart from the symbol the sun-god's gold barque bears two uraei, one in the prow and the other in the stern, the head of each uraeus surmounted by the disk of the sun and the tail replaced by three amulets symbolizing 'goodness' (nefer), 'life' (ankh) and 'stability' (djed).

The straps are composed of separate inlaid gold plaques held together at the back and the sides by rows of small gold, carnelian and glass beads. The plaques embody the same elements as those in the pectoral pendant, except that the sun's disk is substituted for the sign of the horizon and the hieroglyphic sign for 'festival' is placed beneath the scarab. At the upper end of each strap is a curved shoulder-piece representing the vulture of the goddess Nekhbet with wings outstretched. 

Two strings of beads join the vultures to the clasp, which consists of a pair of inlaid gold uraei with a slide-fastening in the center. The semi-precious stones which form the inlay of the various elements in this piece are lapis lazuli, carnelian, felspar and turquoise. It was found in the same casket as the necklace of the rising sun.


Statuette of the God Ihy from Tutankhamun Collection

 Statuette of the God Ihy from Tutankhamun Collection

·        He was a young god, son of goddess HATHOR and god HORUS OF BEHDET.

·        His name meant ‘the sistrum player’. He is considered the personification of joy and delight associated with the sound of the sistrum.

·        He was represented as a naked child with a side lock of hair and sometimes with a finger in his mouth holding the sistrum in his hand, and sometimes the mnat collar one of the cult objects of goddess HATHOR.

Statuette of the God Ihy from Tutankhamun Collection

·        He was a sky god because his mother Hathor was a goddess who had association with the sky.

·        His main cult centre was the Temple of Dendera. In the temple complex, the birth house or "mammisi" was a sanctuary where the mystery of the conception and birth of the divine child Ihy was celebrated.

·        His name was rarely found outside the temple of Dendera, though for example, we occasionally find it in spells of the Coffin Texts or Book of the Dead where he is called "lord of bread… in charge of bear."

·        During the Late Period, he was equated with HORUS THE CHILD then in turn with HARPOCRATES.

Description of the statue:

Among the collection of the gods that were in the treasury, there were two statuettes of god Ihy. They are made out of wood covered with a dark resin and they are identical. This statue is represented completely naked, left leg stepping forward and holding a gilded sistrum in his right hand. His eyebrows are inlaid with gold. He is depicted with the side lock. The colour, symbolizing the fertile soil, may indicate his association with rebirth.



Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...