2013/10/25

The Grand Egyptian Museum

The Grand Egyptian Museum (GEM)  is a planned museum of artifacts of ancient Egypt also known as the Giza Museum . It is largest archaeological museum in the world, the museum is scheduled to open in 2015 and will be sited on 50 hectares of land approximately two kilometers from the Giza pyramids and is part of a new master plan for the plateau. His design was decided by means of an architectural competition and The competition was announced on 7 January, 2002.

The organisers received 1557 entries from 82 countries, making it the largest architectural competition in history. In the second stage of the competition, 20 entries were asked to submit additional information. Judging was complete by 2 June, 2003. The competition was won by the company Heneghan Peng from Dublin, Ireland, winning 250,000 dollars. Second place was awarded to Coop Himmelblau. The building is designed by Heneghan Peng Architects, Buro Happold and Arup. The exhibition masterplan, exhibition design and museology is by Metaphor and Cultural Innovations Ltd.

The Grand Egyptian Museum

The Grand Egyptian Museum

The Grand Egyptian Museum


The Grand Egyptian Museum



The building is shaped like a chamfered triangle in plan. It sits on a site two kilometers west of the pyramids, near a motorway interchange. The building's north and south walls line up directly with the Great Pyramid of Khufu and the Pyramid of Menkaure. In front of the building is a large plaza, filled with date plants. One of the main features of the Museum is the translucent stone wall, made of alabaster, that makes up the front facade of the building.

Inside the main entrance is a large atrium, where large statues will be exhibited. On 2 February, 2010 Hill International announced that Egypt's Ministry of Culture had signed a contract with a joint venture of Hill and EHAF Consulting Engineers to provide project management services during the design and construction of the Grand Egyptian Museum. The total estimated project cost is US$ 550m, US$ 300m of which will be financed from Japanese loans, the remaining will be financed by the Supreme Council of Antiquities, other donations and international funds.

The new museum is designed to include the latest technology, including virtual reality. The Museum will also be an international center of communication between museums, to promote direct contact with other local and international museums. The Grand Egyptian Museum will include a children's museum, conference center, training center, and workshops similar to the old Pharaonic places.


On 5 January, 2002 then-Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak laid the foundation stone of the Grand Egyptian Museum. On 25 August, 2006 the Statue of Ramesses II was moved from Ramses Square in Cairo to the Giza Plateau, in anticipation of construction of the museum. The Statue of Ramesses II, estimated to be approximately 3,200 years old, will be cleaned and touched up, and will be situated at the entrance of the museum by 2010.

In 2007 GEM secured a $300 million loan from the Japan Bank for International Co-operation. The Egyptian Government will fund $147 million while the remaining $150 million will be funded through donations and international organisations. In late August 2008 the design team submitted over 5,000 drawings to the Egyptian Ministry of Culture. Following this, the construction tender was announced in October 2008. Earthmoving has begun to excavate the site for the building.

Tendering was due in September 2009, with an estimated completion date of 2013. On 11 January, 2012 A joint venture between Egypt’s Orascom Construction Industries (OCI) and the Belgian BESIX Group was awarded the contract for phase three of the Grand Egyptian Museum (GEM), a deal valued at $810 million. the project is estimated to finish in 2015 .

Jewelry and Amulets

Everyone wore jewelry. The wealthy had rich ornaments made of gold  and decorated precious stones such as with amethyst, turquoise, and lapis  lazuli. Less wealthy folks wore strings or collars with faience beads and amulets. (Faience is pottery  coated with brightly colored  glazes.) Jewelry, especially  amulets and charms, had  magical and protective powers. Carnelian, turquoise, and  lapis lazuli brought luck.

Jewelry and Amulets


Even  the poorest peasant child wore  a pottery or bone ring or amulet with a crude image of Bes. Amulets magically attracted good luck and kept away  evil. They protected the wearer  from accidents, hunger and  thirst, snakes, demons, and  other everyday dangers.

Amulets were made in many forms: scarabs (beetles) and the ankh (symbols of  eternal life), animals, gods and goddesses, crowns, and the Eye of Horus  (symbol of wholeness).

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